May sale at the Kreinik Factory Outlet Store

Road trip time! Are you a cross stitcher, quilter, weaver, knitter, crocheter, needlepointer, fly tier, spinner, tatter, jewelry maker, crafter…or anyone who likes thread? If so, you will want to make plans now for a fiber extravaganza at the Kreinik factory in Parkersburg, West Virginia. We will open our parking lot and doors for anyone who loves fiber.

The tent sale runs May 10, 11, 12, and 13, 2017 at the Kreinik thread factory, 1708 Gihon Road in Parkersburg, West Virginia (the historic Mid Ohio Valley area). Ever want to feel like you've stepped into a rainbow? This is your chance. Stop by and enjoy a fun day collecting beautiful threads.

Just a few of the offerings:

  • SAMPLER LOVERS will find deals on Soie D'Alger silk floss
  • NEEDLEPOINTERS can buy cones of background colors in Braids and Ribbons
  • CROSS STITCHERS can stock up on fabrics and needles at a sale price
  • QUILTERS will find simply the best high-speed metallic threads (nothing else compares)
  • FOR EVERYONE: Special needle sale for embroiderers, stitchers, bearers, quilters.
  • WEAVERS AND SPINNERS will find interesting fibers for experimenting and expanding their creative options
  • TATTING fans will discover a world of thread colors for making ornaments, jewelry, patches
  • CRAFTERS will find unique materials (iron-on!) to make finished products
  • TEACHERS will love the deals on fiber and craft materials for their students
…and of course there will be plenty more. We will have cones of discontinued colors (some people are collecting all the leftovers!), surplus inventory of your favorites, and super sale prices on other unique Kreinik fibers. You also have a chance to meet and get your photo taken with Doug Kreinik.

Are you a retail shop?

Shops interested in bringing a van of customers should contact Kreinik for commission details and arrangements, info@kreinik.com or 1-800-624-1928.

2017 May Tent Sale Details:

  • 1708 Gihon Road, Parkersburg WV 26101 USA
  • May 10, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • May 11, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • May 12, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • May 13, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Who doesn't love a spring road trip? This one has fabulous fibers as the destination. Bring friends!



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How to stitch smart choices

The Freudian Stitch, one of our favorite cross stitch designers, just released a new pattern featuring the motto, "Make smart choices in your life." Goodness, what a great message for all of us that makes a fun, easy stitching project. Even better, there's a secret, just-as-important, message deep within the stitches, thanks to Kreinik pink glow-in-the-dark thread. Take a look at the photo to see how cleverly this is created.

From the designer's Instagram post releasing the new design:

"I don't want life to imitate art. I want life to be art." These words by Carrie Fisher are inspiring and helped inspire my latest glow in the dark design featuring Kreinik threads. This design is now available in my [Etsy] shop. Stitch this as a reminder to keep making your life art.*

We agree! The clean lines of this pattern make it modern, suitable in any decor, and easy to stitch. The message of this pattern makes it relevant for everyone.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:



Design photos by The Freudian Stitch

#SupportNeedleworkDesigners

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How to use the most versatile metallic thread

This is your year of becoming a Kreinik thread expert. Hopefully you've enjoyed and learned from the blog posts so far (access them via the dated list on the right side of this page). To reach the next level, you need to know about one of the cornerstones of the Kreinik line: Fine #8 Braid.

Fine #8 Braid is possibly the most versatile metallic thread since it can be used by just about every creative technique. It is the perfect size for needlepoint, cross stitch, embroidery, crazy quilting, weaving, bead knitting, bead crochet, tatting, fly fishing, card making, Temari, Hardanger, and more. It was the first metallic developed by the Kreinik family in the early days of the thread company.

Doug Kreinik fills us in on a little history: "In the beginning, my parents, Jerry and Estelle Kreinik, looked at the market and saw that there was a need for a metallic for cross stitch and needlepoint." Estelle was a needlepoint enthusiast, which is how they got involved in the industry. "They first created #8 and #16 braids in 7 colors along with blending filaments. The #8 Braid could be used in both needlepoint and cross stitch," Doug adds. "Since then, #8 has been used in crochet, tatting, smocking, weaving, sewing, quilting, embellishing, rug hooking and even fly fishing bodies."

Today we make #8 Braid—we don't get it from overseas or from another company—in our Parkersburg, West Virginia factory. It comes in 250+ colors including basic metallic shades, hi luster, vintage finish, glow-in-the-dark, and holographic. Corded #8 Braid is a bolder version made to resemble real metal threads.

If you haven't used Fine #8 Braid for your creative project, get a spool in your favorite color and try it. You can't hurt it and you will love the bold metallic effect in your design. It brings visual interest, light, and texture that simply makes projects better.

What you need to know about Kreinik Fine #8 Braid

  1. SIZE: The number 8 simply refers to the number of raw strands we use to make the size (or weight). Fine #8 Braid is twice as thick as Very Fine #4 Braid, and half as thick as Medium #16 Braid.
  2. WHY USE IT: To get a bold metallic look in a design (stronger light and visual effect than the whispy Blending Filament, for example). It can be used right alongside other types of fibers—in fact, that makes a design more interesting.
  3. HOW TO USE IT: Straight off the reel. Just cut a length (about 15 to 18 inches) and go. Don't try to separate it or use more than one strand.
  4. WHERE TO USE IT*: This thread was created to be the same thickness as two strands of embroidery floss. So it provides excellent coverage in cross stitch on 14-count Aida. It is also popular for needlepoint in tent stitch on 18-mesh canvas. 
  5. NEEDLE SIZE: Make sure your needle is large enough to accommodate the thread, otherwise the metallic will shred as you stitch. We suggest Tapestry #22 or #24 for needlepoint and cross stitch. For embroidery or quilting on fabric, use a #20 Chenille needle.
  6. CARE: This metallic can be washed by hand or machine. Tumble dry on low. Do not iron directly onto the metallic, use a press cloth.


For more information



* SIDE NOTE ON WHERE TO USE IT: These recommendations are not set in stone—feel free to use other thread sizes on these fabric/canvas counts if desired, or depending on your stitch selection. Some people prefer a lighter look on 14-count Aida, for instance, and instead choose to use Very Fine #4 Braid. Some needlepointers prefer thicker coverage on 18-mesh, so they select slightly heavier Tapestry #12 Braid. Experiment with your own preferences and design needs.



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How to use Iron-on Threads on fabric

Kreinik Iron-on metallic threads make it easy to add sparkle to story quilts, miniature quilts, wall hangings, fiber art, crazy quilts, ornaments, lampshades and other fabric projects. Create outlines, swirls, borders, bows, webs, and words without the mess of glue or taking the time to stitch an embellishment. When you want a quick embellishment, these fibers are perfect. They come in two sizes: round Medium #16 Braid and flat 1/8” Ribbon.


Step 1: decide on a design


  • Draw a design or write words and names freehand with a fabric pencil or disappearing ink pen
  • Or use a stencil to trace an outline or pattern onto your fabric
  • Or follow the lines already printed on the fabric
  • Tip: the flat ribbon is ideal for borders or outlines, while the round braid is better for words and finer lines

Step 2: have supplies


  • the fabric you’re decorating (fabric should be pre-washed and pre-shrunk)
  • Kreinik Iron-on Threads in colors to match your project
  • Smooth heatproof surface like ironing board, computer mouse pad or fabric covered cardboard
  • Clover brand mini-iron or a household iron
  • Kreinik  Adhesive Teflon press cloth—needed to prevent the thread from sticking to your iron.—available in several sizes
  • Sharp scissors to cut the thread when you’re finished 

Step 3: iron!


  • First, while your iron is unplugged, apply the Adhesive Press Cloth to the plate of your iron. Trim if needed. If you get any bubbles, smooth them out with your fingers, or pop them with a pin and then smooth the area.
  • Turn  your iron onto high and allow it to heat thoroughly (“high” may also be the “linen” setting on some irons). The iron must be on high heat for the thread to adhere properly.
  • Place the thread at a beginning point of your design
  • Press with iron for a few seconds or until the thread adheres.
  • Follow this procedure, working one section at a time for the rest of your design.
  • When finished, clip the thread



Frequently Asked Questions:

  • “Can they be washed?” Yes, and no. Yes, they can be washed, but sometimes the agitation of a washing machine can make them pop off. If so, touch up with a hot iron. We recommend, however, that you couch them down after placement if using on anything that will need to be washed. That will make them secure.
  • “Can you also use them on paper?”  Yes, use these fibers on wood, paper, fabric. You can use them on stitched needlepoint and cross stitch designs. Use them with polymer clay for jewelry too.
  • “Are they suitable for all ages?” As long as a child is old enough to handle a hot iron, they should be fine. We have taught elementary school aged children, with adult supervision, and everyone had a great time.
  • “Do you have to use a craft iron?” You can use a home iron as well. The key is that your iron should have a non-stick coating to keep the adhesive in the thread from sticking to your iron. If your iron isn’t non-stick, simply use a Kreinik Adhesive Press Cloth (available in different sizes). 

For more information:




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The easier way to do beading in needlework

Beads in embroidery create interesting bumpy texture and add 3-dimensional lift. That sounds awesome—until you start stringing a hundred tiny orbs that roll around when you try to pick them up. How many times have you toppled your bead tray, or how many beads have you lost under in the couch, while trying to embroider with them? There's an easier way! We're here to make your bead-life better, with Kreinik Facets.


Kreinik Facets are a bead-like yarn that you couch on the surface of your needlework. They're essentially beads that are already strung together. So you get no mess, no flying beads—only the cool look of 3-D texture without the hassle. On your way to becoming a Kreinik thread expert this year, you will want to explore this fun fiber option. Here's everything you need to know about Kreinik Facets to make your next project as gorgeous as ever.


Five facts about Kreinik Facets

  • It's faster than beading. Imagine simply laying one strand of beads, rather than threading individual beads one at a time.
  • It's a surface embroidery thread, you don't stitch in and out with it like a traditional Kreinik Braid. This actually makes it versatile: you can use it on any size canvas or fabric.
  • It comes in two sizes: regular Facets and Petite Facets, which are half the weight of regular Facets.
  • It comes in a wired version. Aside from the obvious 3-D effects, the wire holds its shape while you couch it down (ie, great for cursive words).
  • You can use it to make interesting cords. Take the red Facets and cord with Kreinik's Micro Ice Chenille in green, for instance, using the Custom Corder tool, then turn the cording into a wreath shape. The Facets look like holly berries.
Where to use Facets

Think of this fun fiber for borders, trims, cording. Use Facets to replicate jewelry, garland, rope-like areas, or any motif where you would normally use beads.
  • needlepoint
  • cross stitch
  • embroidery
  • clothing
  • quilts
  • home decor
How to use Facets
  1. First, prepare the ends. This is the trickiest part about Facets, but easily controllable. Wrap a piece of tape tightly around the end. Use a large needle or awl to open the hole in your fabric or canvas, and plunge the end to the back of your work. Use the needle or your finger to "close" the canvas/fabric fibers around the Facets.
  2. Alternate thread-end prep: use a clear nail polish or FrayCheck™ to stop any raveling. After it dries, the ends can be secured as part of your stitching on the surface of your work (no need to plunge to the back).
  3. Couch Facets (tack them down) using either a matching color of Kreinik thread (like #4 Braid or Cord), a clear monofilament thread, or a contrasting color of any thread (like silk or metallic). What you use to couch them depends on the look you want to achieve in your design. Feel free to experiment and have fun here.
  4.  When finished, either plunge the end to the back (as in #1 above) or use #2 option to finish off the end.
For more information

Find Kreinik Facets, Petite Facets, and Wired Facets in your favorite needlework store. They come on spools or skeins (the wired version). For large projects, they are available on cones by special order.


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Free sparkling spring crochet project


Tis the season! That is, the time of year when it's too warm for winter sweaters but too cold for spring dresses. What's a girl to do when she still wants to wear her art out? Crochet these lightweight fingerless mitts for Easter dresses, tea parties, Sunday school, or early morning waiting at school bus stops. The pattern is free!

Designed by April Garwood for small sizes, the gloves feature Kreinik's soft Ombre metallic yarn. This thread is so soft you won't even notice it by feel. But the variegated color adds light and shine for eye-catching prettiness. It's the perfect add-in fiber for any project needing a special touch. April chose Kreinik's Misty Violet color, which features shades of silver, lilac, lavender, and purple.

April has many more crochet patterns you'll love. Look for her on Ravelry, Etsy, Facebook, the Banana Moon Studio blog, or the Kreinik website (link to her Spring Frost Crocheted Scarf is below). Her background is impressive: a degree in microbiology from the University of Oklahoma. Her "foreground" is universal: "I have yarn in my hands as often as possible." Many patterns are ideal for busy moms who want to make things that are fashionable, creatively fulfilling, and suitable for adults or children.  Thank you, April, for sharing this free pattern with crocheters!

How to get the pattern:
Download this free pattern on the Banana Moon Studio blog here: http://bananamoonstudio.blogspot.com/2017/03/vinita-mitts-jr.html


For more information:

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New needlepoint school

If you're a stitcher, look for needlework retreats and schools in your area or where you can go on vacation. Unlike high school which may have involved homework stress and emotional turmoil, needlework school is fun. It's a chance to socialize with like-minded people—making instant friends—while expanding your stitching repertoire and making something beautiful. Hopefully you will finish your project, but the goal is to learn something and have fun. Don't hesitate to sign up for needlework school.

We recently heard about a new school/retreat in the works for January 2018 at a hotel/spa in Montgomery, Alabama. Organized by Julia Snyder of Key Stitches design company and Leigh Miller of The Needle Bug, it has your interests in mind. The teacher selection is amazing:

Mary Legallet
Tony Minieri
Barbara Elmore
Robin King
Jan Rogers
Debbie Rowley
Julia Snyder
Patricia Sone
Brenda Stofft

Choose from 4-day classes, 2-day classes, or one 6-day class. Get all the details here https://www.canvasaneedlepointadventure.com/ or here https://www.facebook.com/canvasaneedlepointadventure/

Don't fear the teacher, don't fear the project, don't fear the homework…Just sign up and have fun. We're pretty sure you'll discover new ways to use Kreinik threads in some of these classes too. What a great way to become a Kreinik thread expert.


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